Category Archives: Events

Win Guide to March

March started with the Beast from the East and an Amber weather warning. We hope our fellow Wintonians managed to stay warm and dry in the snow.  A big thank you to Trinity Winchester, local carers, emergency services, public sector staff and neighbours who cared for the vulnerable during an unexpected freeze.

As the snow melts and we return to the beginnings of Spring, here’s our Win Guide to March:

Handbags at the ready, The Original Theatre Company will be visiting the Theatre Royal Winchester with a delightful production of Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest, starring Gwen Taylor, 5 – 7 March.  For more details or to book tickets, visit here. Other theatre highlights this month include Slightly Fat Features, think Monty Python meets Cirque du Soleil, 11 March. Lloyd and Rose Buck will be giving a talk, Our Life with Birds, 13 March.  There will be a rare opportunity to meet Golden Eagles, Peregrine Falcons, hawks, owls, starlings and many more, in the theatre! Jason Donovan will be at the Theatre Royal on 16 March, along with his mid-life crisis.  For the younger audience members, don’t forget to book for Peppa Pig, 17 – 18 March.  The Winchester Comedy Festival will be presenting a Comedy Gala, 17 March.

The University of Winchester students will be teaming up with the Theatre Royal for Scratch Shakespeare on 19 March.  With four directors, four theatre companies and four performances inspired by the Bard himself, be there or be a poisonous bunch-backed toad. Our insult (Richard III) not theirs! There is also the chance to see Wessex Dance Academy, 22 March, and the Young Theatre Royal showcase on 27 & 29 March. Oh, and the Swansea City Opera will be bringing the Barber of Seville to the Theatre Royal stage on 20 March.  For full programme details and to book tickets, visit the website here.

Craig Charles, the beloved Red Dwarf actor, will be bringing his Funk & Soul Club to the Guildhall on 9 March from 10pm.  The event is for 18+ years. Support comes from The Soul Rays and Jimi Needles. For full details and to get booking, visit the Guildhall website here.

Don’t forget it’s mother’s day on Sunday 11 March.  There are still a limited number of tickets left for the Great British Gin Festival, which could be a treat.  To snap the last tickets up and find our more, visit here. There are also various offers on offer throughout the city to spoil mums with lunches, dinners or afternoon tea.  Hotel du Vin has an afternoon tea with Champagne deal on, £50 for two. Or the Holiday Inn will be offering afternoon tea with unlimited Prosecco. An 18+ age guidance of course applies.

For some more theatre fun, The Venetian Twins by Carlo Goldoni will be on at the Chesil Theatre, 17 – 24 March directed by Mark Frank.  Goldoni’s timeless comedy is a wonderful whirling confusion of frustrated lovers, bizarre fights between mistaken adversaries and devious plots that go off the rails – with a surprising bitter-sweet twist at the end. Check out the trailer:

Don’t forget to book tickets here.

Whilst we’re at the Chesil Theatre, the 10×10 Playwriting Competition is open for submissions until 30 March.  The theme is Hidden Worlds.  Ten plays will be selected for performances at the 10×10 New Writing Festival to be held in October 2018. The aim of 10×10 is to discover, promote and produce the very best new writing of ten-minute plays. 10×10 has provided a platform for playwrights and played a small but significant role in their continuing successes. For more details and to download the submission form, visit the website here.

Finally, we recommend a trip to Winchester College to hear the Winchester Symphony Orchestra and pianist Ivana Gavric on 24 March, 7.30pm conducted by Nicholas Wilks. The programme includes Jean Sibelius – Finlandia, The Swan of Tuonela, Lemminkainen’s Return and En Saga. Felix Mendelssohn – Piano Concerto no. 1 and Johannes Brahms – Variations on a Theme by Joseph Haydn.

We’ll be bringing you more updates throughout the month @Win_Guide.  Have a fun month, one and all.

Something Wicked This Way Comes

As the ‘dark pleasure’ of the multi-award-winning Mark Bruce Company’s Macbeth arrives at Theatre Royal Winchester (Jan 31 & Feb 1) as part of a national tour, veteran dance-theatre critic Donald Hutera learns more about this compelling new take on Shakespeare’s most notorious couple – and, in a Winchester Guide exclusive, speaks not just to the show’s creator but to the two dancers cast in the leading roles.
MARK BRUCE, choreographer and director
Q. What are your thoughts on Macbeth?
MARK BRUCE: It hits you fast, cuts through to the bone, and for me it’s the least ambiguous of Shakespeare‘s plays. Its darkness opens our nightmares; we recognise fundamental traits inside ourselves, and the consequences of acting upon them. The vicious pursuit of power to fill a void will always be relevant. The Macbeths are everywhere in every age, because they’re a part of us.
 
Q. When did you discover Macbeth and what did you think?
MARK BRUCE:   I first read it as a teenager and, returning to it now, the images and atmosphere it evokes haven’t changed. Its power lies in a relentless tale of supernatural horror told with a beauty and symbolism that reaches to the tragic state of the ‘other.’   The supernatural is always present in Macbeth, bending our own thoughts and perceptions as well as those of the protagonists. It infects us, always one step ahead, and Macbeth’s decisions are made in the world of a nightmare as if there’s no separation between thought and action. Murder is done and descent is rapid.
 
Q. Why choose Macbeth?
MARK BRUCE: It’s something I’ve always wanted to do. I had a vision of Macbeth’s world and some of the cast in mind. It was the same with my company’s previous shows, Dracula and The Odyssey.  The choreographic language of Macbeth is very specific and detailed, and I felt I had the right dancers at the right time in their careers to pursue this vocabulary.  I do feel there’s a time when you are ready to do a production, and you can’t really contrive that.

Q. Your production puts Lady Macbeth centre-stage with Macbeth himself. Please say more…
MARK BRUCE: The Macbeths are mere playthings of the evil they set free, and in the madness and emptiness that ensues they become but walking shadows, or – as in my adaptation – simply clowns of sound and fury.
Q. Are you influenced by other artists?
MARK BRUCE: Influences always begin subconsciously and often it’s only in retrospect that I identify them. I also don’t expect to completely understand why an influence has imposed itself. I do think I’ve been affected by the films of David Cronenberg for this production: their pace, his economic shot selection and the film Eastern Promises especially. The brooding atmosphere, the colour, the darkness seem to marry with the world and characters I saw Macbeth taking place in. Compared to a production like The Odyssey, in which there was a myriad of influences, Macbeth is far more lean. It’s written for the stage. My approach has been quite simple so I can really explore the text, and get deeply into the characters and the world in which it is set. 
Q. How do you choose your dancers for Mark Bruce Company productions?
MARK BRUCE: Sometimes I’ll have particular dancers in mind for a production and this will have a bearing on whether I pursue it or not – whether it’s an established narrative or something I’ve written myself. With Macbeth I had a combination of dancers I already knew and some new ones. I held an audition for which we had over six hundred and fifty applicants. From this I took three dancers. They needed to be strong dramatically and in contemporary and classical technique.
 
Q. Your music choice for Macbeth is classical and doesn’t involve any of your own compositions, unlike many of your other productions.
MARK BRUCE:   The music of Arvo Pärt was a fundamental decision in realising a through-line for Macbeth. I was instantly drawn to how it captures something deep inside us. It can be sparse and refined, and for me Macbeth is a refined play. Like Arvo Pärt’s music, there’s so much going on with every line, every suggestion, and this enables our imagination to transcend to the state of what’s inside the protagonists, what they are missing, and the state of their souls. I felt the combination of the subject matter and this music created something beautiful and tragic. These two elements were the basis of my interpretation of Macbeth.
ELEANOR DUVAL and JONATHAN GODDARD, dancers
 
Q. What are the pleasures (and any perils!) of working for and with Mark Bruce?
ELEANOR DUVAL: This process has been a pleasurable one. We started with some R&D a year ago with a few dancers in the studio, where Mark tried some ideas out and started working on the relationship between the Macbeths. He’s taken his time to create these characters, which has also given us time to inhabit them. Everything has been very detailed, and the ‘conversations’ between Jon and myself are crucial to the plot. The new studio the company has in Frome is a game-changer. There all the creative team have been around, and we’ve had the set up in the studio from day one of rehearsals, so a real sense of atmosphere and excitement has been apparent from the beginning. I guess the only peril working for Mark is that I seem to have very disturbing dreams!
JONATHAN GODDARD: This is my third production with Mark, and I enjoy trying to bring the visions he has into the world. It’s always interesting to see how a director imagines a character, and I relish the darkness of the roles – thankfully quite different to my own temperament and life.
 
Q. What sorts of things have you discovered during the creation period about the character you play?
ELEANOR DUVAL: Lady Macbeth is extremely manipulative and will do anything to gain power. I feel during the creation time I put a lot of work into how I could make this clear to an audience. The result has been an editing process where ‘less is more.’ The calmer she remains the stronger she comes across. The detail in every look is crucial. Mark spent a long time with Jonathan and me on our physical and mental reactions to the various situations we find ourselves in during the piece. One thing that surprised me was the vulnerability in my character. Obviously I know the play, and the ‘washing of the hands’ scene is well-known. Her insanity, however, builds throughout this production. Lady Macbeth remains strong for her husband until her stubbornness, pride and denial finally cracks, and everything spirals out of her control.
 
JONATHAN GODDARD: It’s been interesting to give myself over to a character that seems to aspire to total freedom, but who also has to negotiate and bear the extreme repercussions and effects of his actions and fate.  I love that Shakespeare makes everything happen right away, right that minute. If Macbeth decides to murder someone he’ll do it straight away; if things go wrong, they spiral fast. It makes the journey a thrilling one, and demands real on-the-spot commitment to some quite extreme moments.
 
Q: What have you discovered about yourself as an artist and a person?
ELEANOR DUVAL: Worryingly, I’ve discovered that I enjoy being an incredibly awful person! It’s been a real treat to dip into something this evil. I’ve also found the detail and precision of the choreography an enjoyable challenge. We’ve worked closely from the script in creating a choreographic language. Every nuance and accent is specific. Of all the productions I’ve danced in for Mark this has been a very different approach, and therefore I’ve learnt new skills at the right time in my career.
JONATHAN GODDARD: That I’m still enjoying dancing in my late thirties. It takes longer and longer to warm up, but I’m still curious and my body is just about doing what I want it to.
Q. If this version of Macbeth were to be experienced with all the senses, how might it smell, feel and taste?
ELEANOR DUVAL: This production would definitely taste metallic and smell of flesh. However there are sweet tastes along the way as I feel Mark has created a lot of beauty within the harshness.
JONATHAN GODDARD: I think it would taste metallic, and feel as if someone has just left you alone in a car park at night!
Q. What will it sound and look like?
ELEANOR DUVAL: Truly beautiful. 
JONATHAN GODDARD: It sounds very beautiful. Mark has worked with a lot of Arvo Pärt for this production. I think this music captures Macbeth’s sort of transcendent state and the constant presence of the supernatural in his world.  
Q. In a nutshell, why does this Macbeth need to be seen and experienced?
ELEANOR DUVAL: It’s a unique production that touches all the senses. Audiences will ultimately find it cathartic. Mark has created a world which we have all delved into, from the dancers to the creative team – lights, costumes and set. The audience will have a chance to be drawn into this world and experience Shakespeare’s savage tragedy in all its beauty.
JONATHAN GODDARD: I think Macbeth always feels very modern and current to audiences. It definitely speaks to now and the perils of power unchecked. It’s a brilliant introduction to dance-theatre if you haven’t seen any before and, hopefully, a dark pleasure if you have.
Company and tour info: http://www.markbrucecompany.com/
  

Win Guide to January

Happy New Year, Wintonians. The christmas festivities may be over but we’re very excited about 2018 in Winchester. Here’s our guide to some invigorating arts and culture in the city this January.

To start the year off with some live music, take a look at the Railway Inn’s programme.  Events include Riteoff (12 Jan), Who Killed Nancy Johnson? (13 Jan), Lucy Bernandez and Friends (19 Jan), Blackstone Jones (20 Jan) and the Department electro party (26 Jan).  For full details or to book tickets, visit the website here.

From the Jam will be taking the Guildhall by storm (26 January) whisking you back to the early 80s.  The band is comprised of legendary former ‘The Jam’ bassist Bruce Foxton, vocalist & guitarist Russell Hastings, drummer Mike Randon, and Andy Fairclough on Hammond and piano.  Tickets (14+) are available here.

For a different aesthetic, Index Cantorum will return with an immersive musical performance at Winchester Cathedral 20 Jan, 12pm & 1pm.  Experience the music in a promenade or sit in the nave whilst the singers encircle the audience. The event is free with a retiring collection.  For details, visit the cathedral website here.

Tom Kempinski’s ‘Duet for One’ is a thought provoking piece at the Chesil Theatre (20-27 Jan). The play which premiered starring Frances De la Tour in the 1980s is inspired by the story of Jacqueline du Pre and her conductor husband, Daniel Barenboim.  A virtuoso violinist, Stephanie has lived for music since the age of four. She and her composer husband appear a golden couple until she is struck down with multiple sclerosis. Can she adjust to a different life? The story is told through successive interviews with a psychiatrist whose quiet probing unveils the true picture. For ticket details, visit the website here.

The Theatre Royal will be hosting the World Premiere of Mark Bruce’s dance theatre adaptation of Macbeth 31 January. That’s right, you can see it here first.  Goaded by the whispers of demons, the Macbeths unleash murder for their own gains and set in motion their path to madness and self-destruction, unravelling events in a nightmare they cannot control. To book tickets, visit the theatre website here.

Trailer:

Macbeth Trailer from Mark Bruce Company on Vimeo.

We’ll be bringing you more highlights throughout the month on Twitter @Win_Guide.  Have a great start to 2018, one and all.

Review of Peter Pan by Sophia, aged 6

Sophia went to see Peter Pan with her primary school. Here is her review of this year’s Theatre Royal Winchester pantomime:

I went to the Theatre Royal and the show was called Peter Pan.  It was so fun!

So there were some characters and one of them was called Tiger-Lily.  I liked her because she was good and she had a costume that looked like a tiger.  There was a really amazing song that I really liked and it had the word ooh-ahh in it.

There was Tinker Bell and it was actually amazing because she really looked like a fairy, she was small and green and she glowed.  There was someone who was Peter Pan and it looked like he was flying.  There was a crocodile and it went on its feet and the feet were sideways.  It looked really good!

There was someone called Wendy and she had brown hair like me and she went to Netherland with Peter Pan.  Captain Hook had a golden bit in the middle and it was shiny.  He was funny and he had a beard.  And there was a disco ball.

At the end we sang a song and it was a really funny Pirate song.  If I could have been in the pantomime I would have been the ballerina.

Sophia and her class had a brilliant time at Peter Pan.  Don’t miss out! To book tickets, visit the Theatre Royal Winchester website here.

‘Thrilling’ is the key word as Charge comes to Winchester’s Theatre Royal

Donald Hutera talks to Kevin Finnan, the artistic director of Motionhouse

Given that creative energy is never in short supply Motionhouse, it may come as no surprise that energy is the core subject of the latest touring show by this long-established, UK-based company. But the production, entitled Charge, is nevertheless bound to offer visual thrills and kinetic surprises aplenty as it uses dance, acrobatics, digital projection and a galvanising soundtrack to probe the sources that activate life in the human body.

I fired off a few questions to Motionhouse’s artistic director Kevin Finnan in advance of the imminent performances at Theatre Royal, Winchester Nov 10 and 11. Here are his answers in an exclusive interview for this website.

Donald Hutera: Charge is part of what the company is calling the Earth Trilogy that includes the shows Scattered and Broken. What prompted this trilogy in the first place?

Kevin Finnan: It wasn’t originally conceived as a trilogy. It started out as a single show, Scattered, which was about water. But Scattered opened up ways of engaging with the human condition, eliciting questions about the environment and a way of working that was really interesting to me. So I decided to make Broken, a show about our relationship with the earth that could develop all of these questions and explore this way of working. That show raised yet more questions and prompted me to make Charge, a show about energy. So it’s a trilogy that has revealed itself through doing.

DH: What forms of research did you and the company undertake in order to create Charge?

KF: To make a show about energy on the micro and macro scale you have to read widely on the subject to gain some small understanding, and search for ideas that will make the story visible.  I did a large amount of academic research. I went to a stimulating event in Oxford run by the Tipping Point/Stories for Change teams. I eventually found – through Sophy Smith, my composer – the work of Dame Professor Frances Ashcroft at Oxford University. I got in touch and she graciously agreed to meet me, afterwards agreeing to help and becoming a partner in the project.

This developed into a series of meetings between my creative team with Frances and her team, during which we spent time discussing the workings of electricity and the human body. Imagine having a whole room of dedicated scientists and artists discussing electrical transmission in the human body. What a gift, and an invaluable resource! Later in the process Frances and some of her team traveled up to see our work in the rehearsal room, and to give feedback. To have access to such fantastic, cutting-edge thought is a thrill, and very humbling. It opens new ways of seeing the world. I can’t imagine I would be creating an ion channel onstage without Frances, as I’d never even heard of them!

I’ve also set a course with the dancers to expand the physical language we use. We recently collaborated on a work with No Fit State Circus called Block which brought fresh skills and impetus into the company, and we’re continuing to explore and expand the use and role of spectacle in our work. In the studio we’re constantly trying to challenge ourselves to move on, creating and stockpiling ideas. With Charge we also spent a lot of time exploring our relationship with the digital. This show crossed the Rubicon for us as it was a massive jump in terms of its complexity of ideas and delivery.

DH: More specifically, how did the work’s themes and ideas get translated into actions and images? I’m especially interested in how scientific principles become theatre.

KF: In a large-scale spectacle the narrative line is created before any movement, and images are developed to it within a strict timeline. With Charge I knew the themes, but had no firm idea of the form with which to tell them.

For all of our stage shows I try to be as open as possible. Through the research process I narrow things down to a series of themes and movement ideas to explore. This creates a series of mental pictures I wish to realise. The company is then encouraged to play and create with each other and the environment. What I do not do is come in with a narrative line as that makes devising very difficult for the dancers and collaborators. Things float and change and everyone’s quite lost for a long time. I have to trust that, in partnership with my fellow artists, I’ll be able to realise the work in the time available.

Ultimately I’m waiting for the work to reveal itself; the creation process is about continuing to explore until you recognise what you’re looking for.

As an example of this, two of the dancers in Charge had been improvising with an idea for a strop duet. When I saw that I played a certain type of music to it, knowing it would work as a thread throughout the show to explore the notion of fading memory as in dementia or Alzheimer’s – where essentially the mind goes dark as there’s no energy passing in that part of the brain.  I saw that the spatial separation inherent in what the dancers created could express this narrative; it would be beautiful, sad and troubling. This is a good example of wanting to embody and make visual a scientific fact, and waiting for the right material to emerge.

An example on the other end of the scale is the work we did on the human heart. The heart beats to a rhythm; all the muscles must be activated at the right time to make the heart muscles open and close together. You can imagine the pulse as a single flash. When you have a heart attack, the rhythm of the spark is interrupted; it’s off-beat, with many points twinkling. This makes the heart go flaccid and unable to pump. The electric shock you see being given in TV programmes set in hospitals is not to restart the heart, but to stop it. The hope is that when it restarts naturally it will restart in rhythm. It’s a bit like restarting your computer. Delving even deeper, it’s the single transmission of electrical energy – the line of ions waiting to pass through the Ion channel – that makes all this possible.

We began by exploring ‘making hearts’ on our own and in groups, moving them and beating them. How would a heart attack make a physical score? Unity to chaos; it seemed quite simple, but in making it we found that chaos meant we completely lost the image of the heart and it just looked like formless, abstract dance. The solution was to keep enough form to recognise the heart, but introduce the breakdown of unity within that form. We then played with how we could make that moment of pulse tell the story in a different way – exploring momentary tableaux, and breaking down movement to a single flash to show the external story of a heart attack. But whose heart is it, and how could we visualise and embody the ion channel?

Our research around the idea of the single energy flow across the cell created so much material that I could just go on and on. Professor Ashcroft is so pleased with our work in this area that she’s asked for film of the show to use at conferences.

DH: This is fascinating stuff, Kevin. Could you mention a few other highlights of the show?

KF: Well, there’s a section where we journey from Galvani’s frogs through to Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Here we’re telling the story of our modern comprehension of the human body as an electrically-activated system. And how do we explore the idea of what a memory is – a mutating, complex physical structure that’s built and developed by the brain like the growing of a tree, but only accessed and animated by sparks of electrical energy? We began using silk to signify the tendrils of the mind, and then interacting with film to develop the energy flow.  I love this section. But the company looks great throughout Charge, and really shows what they can do. I’m very proud of them.

DH: What, not incidentally, are some of the qualities and attributes that a performer must have to be a member of Motionhouse?

KF: They have to be daring, bold and committed to working together to realise something as an ensemble. The range of skills and what’s asked of them makes them a special group.

DH: Are you able to encapsulate a little of what you’ve learnt from making Charge?

KF: It was an extremely difficult show to make for a number of reasons. Basically we learned that if we all pull together we can do anything.

DH: Finally, what is Motionhouse’s place in both the UK and global, dance-based cultural ecology?

KF: We started out as dance-theatre and then, fed up with the restrictions of that, we became just Motionhouse. Others then began calling us dance-circus, so we’ve assumed that mantle too. We seem to have just wandered off on our own. I don’t see much that seems like us. All along I’ve simply pursued an interest between movement, imagery and spectacle, and then try to make work that’s emotionally engaging, thrilling to watch and driven by a roiling physical energy. I continue to be amazed at and proud of both the number of people who see us, and the reception they give us. It’s a huge relief that we’ve found a large and very passionate audience for our work.

Friday 10 & Saturday 11 November.
Theatre Royal Winchester
https://www.theatreroyalwinchester.co.uk/charge/

 

Win Guide to November

If you take a stroll through the city you’ll see that the wooden cabins have been constructed, the lights are hanging above the high street and Winchester is ready to get festive.  But fear not, whether you are ready to get into the spirit or not, there’s plenty of entertainment to amuse this month. Here’s our guide to whats on in the city in November…

It’s the 6th edition of the Winchester short film festival, with screenings taking place between the 3rd and 11th November.  Screenings take place at various locations throughout the city, and you can view the full programme here.

Winchester University is running its weekly faculty of arts talks on a Wednesday afternoon between 4.30pm – 6pm on campus.  These are free to attend and an opportunity to hear about some of the research being undertaken at the University.  November’s programme is:

8 November | 4.30pm | SAB203
A Nexus of Creativity: Musical Comedy at Daly’s Theatre, 1894-1899 (Presented via video link).
Prof. William Everett (University of Missouri-Kansas City)

15 November | 4.30pm | SAB201
The Facts and Trials of Jane Griffin, hanged for the murder of Elizabeth Osborn, 29 January 1720
Debbie Webber (Winchester)
&
An ekphrastic inspiration for a writer: Bruegel’s depictions of Carnival
Lisa Koning (Winchester)

22 November | 4.30pm | SAB203
Greenwashing Culture
Prof. Toby Miller (Loughborough University London)

29 November | 4.30pm | MB5
‘Meaningless secretaries and humourless bitches’: Mad Men, mediations of women’s work, and the vexed question of feminism
Prof. Caroline Bainbridge (University of Roehampton)

Have you bought your panto ticket yet for the Theatre Royal’s Peter Pan?  There’s an exciting programme of work to explore meanwhile.  The celebrated Motion House Charge will be bringing their exciting dance circus show about energy on 10, 11 November. Motionhouse is working with partners from Oxford University to support the creative and choreographic process, putting science at the heart of artistic practice. Tickets are available here.

Other highlights include the Shakespeare Schools Festival, which gives local schools a change to tread the boards staging a Shakespeare play, 7-8 November.  John Boden will be bringing his fiddle, guitar, concertina and trademark stomp box, 12 November. Wayne Ellington will be singing Nat King Cole on 22 November.  Or if you can’t wait to get festive, join the Winchester Musical and Opera Society for Irving Berlin’s White Christmas, 15 – 18 November.  For a full programme or to book tickets, visit the website here.

Heart Radio’s Rich will be leading the city in the Christmas Light Switch on 16 November. There will be live entertainment on offer, with events taking place between 4 – 7pm.  The lights should be officially switched on at 6pm.  Event details can be found here.

Don’t forget to visit the Chesil Theatre for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Hound of the Baskervilles adapted by Steven Canny and John Nicholson.  When Sir Charles Baskerville is found dead on his estate, a look of terror still etched on his face and the paw prints of a gigantic hound beside his body, the great detective Sherlock Holmes is summoned from Baker Street. The production will run between 17 – 25 November and you can book tickets here.

Finally, the Winchester Cathedral Christmas market opens 20 November and will be available daily until 22 December.  The Ice Rink also opens 20 November and will be open until 7 January. The Cathedral have produced a helpful guide to festivities in the city which you can visit here.

Have a wonderful month, Wintonians. We’ll be bringing you more updates on Twitter @Win_Guide…

Win Guide to October

Autumn is upon us, a time for knitwear, leafy walks in vibrant reds and burnt orange or perhaps a time to head indoors and visit some of Winchester’s cosy city hosts. Here’s the Win Guide to what’s on this October:

The first thing any Wintonian ought to do is follow in the footsteps of Keats, who composed his ‘Ode to Autumn’ whilst gadding about the water meadows, or there about.  For a detailed walking trail, follow the guide provided by Winchester’s Tourist Information Centre here.

Going to the Ball (San Martino)

Don’t miss the opportunity to visit the modest Turner exhibition in the Discovery Centre, closing on the 15 October.  Entry is free and it’s a fine opportunity to admire the breathtaking ‘master of light’. For more information, visit here. Comedian Paul Sinha will be bringing his show Shout Out To My Ex on 7 October at 7.30pm, also at the Discovery Centre. For details, visit the website here.

BBC History Magazine’s Winchester History Weekend will be running 6 – 8 October, in association with Waterstones and for its second year.  Events will take place in the Great Hall and the Ashburton Hall, Elizabeth Court. To book for some of the exciting speakers, visit the website here.

If you have little people, make sure you have booked your tickets at the Theatre Royal for The Gruffalo, 6-8 October and Stick Man, 13-15 October. Don’t forget to read our interview with a member of the Stick Man cast, here. Bring the much-loved modern classic stories to life with some live performance in our beloved local theatre. For more details, visit the website. For the slight older children, Michael Morpurgo’s King Arthur is on 22 October.

Meanwhile, there are plenty of things on at the Theatre Royal for grown ups to enjoy too.  Jay Rayner will be bringing his The Ten (Food) Commandments on Friday 5 October.  He’ll ‘invite thee to honour thy pig – and so much more besides’. Opera della Luna will be presenting The Tales of Offenbach on 11 October and Bilimankhwe Arts’ dance version of The Tempest will delight us with traditional Malawian music.

There’s comedy aplenty, including Winchester Comedy Festival – Comedy Gala (6th) Mark Watson (7th), Penny Ashton (16th) Lea Anderson (18th), Ed Byrne (19th, 20th) and Stewart Lee (21st). Comedy drama fans can enjoy Sherlock Holmes and the Crimson Cobbles (25th, 26th) and there’s live music from The Baroque Bohemians (10th), Graham Gouldman, one of the founding members of 10cc (17th) and the Spitfire Sisters (28th). Finally Winchester Poetry Festival will be hosting a Winchester Poetry day on 14 October, and the delectable Private Lives by Noel Coward opens on the 30 October. For full details or to get booking, visit here.

Things get spooky at the end of the month in time for half-term.  Join the Halloween Spooky Trail, with a riddle sheet that can be picked up from Winchester’s Tourist Information Centre. Don’t miss the activities at the City Mill including baking, pumpkin carving and storytelling.

Plenty to amuse and entertain this October and we’ll be bringing you more highlights throughout the month on Twitter @Win_Guide.

 

Stick Man – cast interview with Christopher Currie

Stick Man by Scamp Theatre and Freckle Productions is coming to the Theatre Royal Winchester, Fri 13 – Sun 15 October. Here’s an interview with a member of the cast, Christopher Currie.

Tell us about Stick Man

Stick Man is the sweet story of an anthropomorphic stick who becomes lost and finds himself far from home. The show is based on Julia Donaldson and Alex Scheffler’s charming and much-loved book.

At the start of our tale Stick Man is happy, living in the family tree with his stick family. Like so many of our favourite heroes, Stick Man will have to lose what he has before he perhaps comes to a deeper awareness of just how precious the love he has really is.

In the face of scary dogs and happy holidaymakers he will assert that he is “Stick Man” and not just any old stick, but can he hold on to his identity long enough? Can he remember who he is and what is dear to him when he is far from what he knows and in a world where everybody would have him be otherwise?

What do you hope the audience will take away from the production? 

I hope the audience, young and older, will rediscover this tale anew and be excited, moved and warmed by our adaptation.

What was your initial response to the Stick Man script? 

I had never read the book so I did this first. I was delighted when I read the script and observed how innovative it was in bringing the story to life. I felt excited to be involved.

My thoughts were that like Stick Man, us adults must all quest to find home in our lives (whether to rediscover the home we loved when we were young and left behind or the home we long to discover out there) and to stand up for who we are in the face of adversity. This is why Stick Man’s story is and will be everyone’s story. A story we must all live, each in our own way, every day.

Have you find it hard bringing a character to life from the book?

No, I can’t say I have so far. I am aware that we will be joined my puppets to further bring the characters to life. I feel that my physicality suits stick man and that bringing his humanness alive is something I am equipped to do. I think it will be a new challenge though when we rehearse together and the characters come alive in new ways, in relationship with each other.

Did you always want to be an actor? How did you get to where you are today?

As a child, my brother and I delighted in playing with our cuddly toys, giving them voices and adventures. Yes – I have always wanted to act, even though I have other passions as well. When I was fifteen I was offered a role in the school Shakespeare play. It gave me the chance to express emotions inside of me that I could not outside of school and this was very therapeutic and empowering for me at the time. As time went on I realised I had an aptitude for the work and how much it excited me.  After three years of auditioning, I was thrilled to be offered a place to study at the Guildhall School of Music & Drama in London which was a remarkable place to be. I was gifted with the most brilliant education, it was such a creative and rewarding environment.

What was your favourite book growing up?

Ooh great question! Gosh um…I think my favourite book growing up was Roald Dahl’s Matilda. I adored the story of the girl who was made to feel less, then found her kind teacher Miss Honey and felt like she was finally seen for who she really was. It’s wonderful! In my earlier years, my parents subscribed me to a magazine series which came with cassette tapes of a series of fairy tales brought to life. This was wonderful, I am so grateful for this. My imagination was enriched by these stores. They are magical times, when we read our first stories.

What would you say to encourage people to buy a ticket?

This is such a lovely and clever adaptation of the book, full of life. I think children and adults are bound to have a fabulous time.

Any advice for budding actors?

I think acting is a wonderful opportunity to give a gift to others and that at its best it is an act of great empathy. Be generous and make it all about those whose lives you touch through your acting and the characters you inhabit. A professional training is a wonderful experience but it is not always financially manageable for everyone these days. Watch the actors you love and ask yourself what it is about them that makes them special to you? Surround yourself with those who love you and support you and choose to believe in yourself, even when things don’t go the way you might have planned. Finally try not to get too caught up in all the drama of being an actor or how “good” you are in the eyes of others. You are a vessel for something bigger. When you come from your heart in your acting it will be full and the world will benefit from it.

Stick Man is live at the Theatre Royal Fri 13 – Sun 15 October:
Fri 4pm
Sat 11am, 2pm, 5pm
Sun 11am, 2pm
For more info and to book tickets, visit here.
Stick Man trailer:

 Stick Man is on a UK tour from September 2017 to January 2018. Find out more over at www.StickManLive.com.
Stick Man © 2008 Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler. Published by Alison Green Books, an imprint of Scholastic Children’s Books.

Win Guide to September

September is here, the summer holidays for some have come to an end but fear not, for Winchester is offering plenty to amuse and entertain us all this month.

Winchester Heritage Open Days

You have hopefully read our Heritage Open Days guide but just in case you missed it, don’t forget to visit some of the many free events on offer locally to celebrate our heritage, 7-10 September. Over the four days there will be more than 70 events: everything from guided walks and labyrinths to storytelling and river dipping for families, and gin and cider tastings for the over 18s. You can even make your own Medieval encaustic tile. Remember all events are free of charge although some you will need to pre-book as numbers are limited. There are also competitions including a chance to win one of the first Monopoly Winchester Edition games. For more details, visit the website here.

Pin Drop ComedyPin Drop Comedy will be hosting their monthly open mic night at the Wintonian Bar in the Guildhall, 7 September.  The bar is open throughout, so come down, relax and enjoy comedy straight from the street. Entry is FREE.

Later in the month look forward to the Winchester Jazz Festival. The festival runs 21st – 24th September with acts performing at various venues throughout the city.  Head along to the Guildhall on 22 September for an evening of jazz provided by a swinging band and try your hand at Lindy Hop, as instructed by dynamic duo Bic and Simone from The Lindy Club. Dance the night away or sit back and enjoy the music! Tickets are available here. For a full programme of festival events, visit the Winchester Jazz Festival website here.

The Theatre Royal has a number of treats on offer this month, including its Open Weekend, 16 – 17 September. The theatre is throwing open its doors for all the family to enjoy behind the scenes tours, theatre workshops and craft activities.  The event is FREE and you can drop in between 12 – 4pm each day.  Why not book tickets for ‘Austen Undone’ running throughout the open weekend, a promenade performance through the city presented by Natural Theatre Company.  For full details, visit the website here.

It’s the Michaelmas Fair at the Hospital of St Cross, 23 September from 9.30am – 4pm.  Medieval knights will be demonstrating their skills alongside falconry displays by Falconhigh display team and a static display of at least 12 birds of prey. There will be 20 craft stalls to be found in and around the beautiful buildings and grounds of The Hospital of St Cross. Refreshments are available and parking is free. Entrance is £3, or free for children 12 years and under.

You might visit the Chesil Theatre as part of the Winchester Heritage Open Days but if not, it’s worth looking out for Blithe Spirit by Noel Coward, 16 – 23 September, directed by Tom Williams. Charles Condomine invites medium, Madame Arcati, to hold a séance at his home. The unintended consequences lead to a merry dance of mayhem, mischief and murder. Later in the month The Railway Plays offers a collection of eight short plays: an enticing smorgasbord of style, subject and theatrical approach, performed back-to-back in under 90-minutes. The plays have been written and directed by Nicholas Joseph, a playwright/director and senior lecturer at UoW. For more details or to book tickets, visit the Chesil Theatre website here.

Don’t forget to visit the Hampshire Harvest Festival, 30 September – 1 October, a fun packed family event celebrating local produce and farming. Activities include live music, children’s have-a-go activities, vintage tractors, falconry displays, farm animals, horse-drawn wagon rides, Hampshire Fare market, local beers and ciders and, new for this year, an afternoon tea tent offering wonderful cakes, scones, tea and even a glass of fizz. A special Evensong service celebrating harvest will take place in the Cathedral at 3.30pm on Sunday afternoon, all are welcome. There is also a Scarecrow competition with full details available here.

It really is a bumper September in Winchester so there’s no time for end of the summer blues.  We’ll be bringing you more updates on twitter @Win_Guide. Enjoy, one and all!

Winchester Heritage Open Days 2017

Come & celebrate culture & heritage in Winchester this September as part of the Heritage Open days national festival. Thurs 7- Sun 10 Sept 2017

Why not be a tourist in your own town for a day or even two?

Come and discover some of the many hidden places and secrets in Winchester and the surrounding villages all completely FREE! Over four days there will be more than 70 events celebrating our local heritage: everything from guided walks and labyrinths to storytelling and river dipping for families, and gin and cider tastings for the over 18s. You can even make your own Medieval encaustic tile.

Remember all events are free of charge although some you will need to pre-book as numbers are limited. There are also competitions including a chance to win one of the first Monopoly Winchester Editiongames.

www.WinchesterHeritageOpenDays.org
or follow us on twitter @WinchesterHods

Listings

Andrew Smith & Son – Antiques & Asian Arts valuation evening 17.00-20.00 (7th)
Pilgrims Hall, The Close, Winchester SO23 9LT
Join us by 5:30pm to listen to Asian Art specialist James Hammond, on the changing nature of the market in Asian Art, and Andrew Smith who will give an insight into the modern auction world. Throughout evening a full team of specialist valuers will be on hand for informal valuation advice on any antiques or works of art brought in on the evening.

Aspects of Winchester – an exhibition at Winchester Heritage Centre 10.00 – 16.00 (7th, 8th & 9th)
Address: Winchester Heritage Centre 32 Upper Brook Street Winchester SO23 8DG
The City of Winchester Trust has invited a group of artists in Winchester, who meet regularly to paint and sketch around the city, to produce an exhibition representing their work. Limited edition prints and cards will be available for sale.

Carter Marsh & Co 11.00 – 16.00 (7th, 8th)
Address: Carter Marsh & Co 32A The Square Winchester SO23 9EX
Carter Marsh & Co are renowned dealers of antique clocks and watches and will be celebrating their 70th anniversary in the city this year. Come and watch skilled craftsmen at work and delight at some of the finest examples of antiquarian horology on display in the showroom.

Cosmic Walk and Labyrinth Tours: 11.00-12.00 & 12.30-13.00 (7th, 8th)
Address: University of Winchester, West Downs Student Village Romsey Road Winchester SO22 5HT
Stroll with us from the beginning of time as we discover the unfolding story of the Cosmos and reconnect with our world. The Cosmic Walk features a Labyrinth and offers visitors the opportunity to reflect upon their relationship with the Earth and the Divine.

Chesil Theatre: (9th, 10th)
Address: Chesil Theatre 4 Chesil Street Winchester SO23 0HU
Discover the delightful 12th century church of St Peter’s Chesil, converted to an intimate 75 seat theatre about 40 years ago. See behind the scenes, the stage and lights along with costumes, set designs and photos which will also be on display. Members of the Winchester Dramatic Society will be available to answer your questions.

Gieves and Hawkes Archive 09.00 – 17.30 (7th, 8th, 9th & 10th, times vary)
Address: Gieves & Hawkes Ltd 1-2 The Square Winchester SO23 9ES
For more than two centuries Gieves and Hawkes has been the world’s foremost in bespoke tailoring and has dressed every British Sovereign since George III.  Come and learn about the company’s military history and view some of their archive pieces, including Princess Diana’s original Hampshire Regiment colonel in chief uniform jacket. 

HCT: Abbey House Collections Tours 1000, 1200 & 1430 (7th)
Address: Abbey House The Broadway Winchester SO239BE
Take a guided tour of some of the  city’s collections of paintings and furnishings rarely on display to the public. Originally built as a private house around 1700, Abbey House was bought by  Winchester  City Council in 1889 and restored to its original 18th century splendour following extensive refurbishment in the 1980s. It is now the official residence of the Mayor of Winchester.

Hyde 900: Medieval tile display & workshop 1000-1600 (7th, 8th, 9th & 10th)
Address: Winchester Cathedral Chapter House Garden Winchester SO23 9LS
A display of encaustic tiles found on the site of Hyde Abbey. Discover their history and how they were made and why not have a go at making them in the medieval manner– but be prepared to get your hands dirty! For a fee your tile can also be glazed and fired.

Kingsgate – A Walk Through Time Walk: 1500 (7th, 8th & 9th)
Address: Kingsgate Arch Kingsgate Street Winchester SO23 9PD
This walking tour takes in Wolvesey Palace, site of the medieval palace of the bishops of Winchester, continues down College Street past the College and the house where Jane Austen spent her last months, and ends with Kingsgate Arch and the 13th century church of St Swithun above.

Old Hyde House, ADAM Architecture offices Tour: 1000 & 1200 (7th, 8th)
Address: Old Hyde House 75 Hyde Street Winchester SO23 7DW
Built on part of the original 12th century Hyde Abbey Precinct, Old Hyde House is Grade II* listed and has served many uses over the years. Visitors will be given a guided tour of the offices, hear the building’s rich history and see remnants of the old buildings that still exist today. Unsuitable for children under 15yrs.

Oram’s Arbour: a walking tour Walk: 1800-1900 (7th)
Address: Oram’s Arbour, Winchester
A guided walking tour with local architect, George Saumarez Smith, describing the district around Oram’s Arbour. The walk will explore how it has changed since medieval times and how the area to the west was developed around West End Terrace.

Peninsula Barracks: a walking tour Walk: 1000 (7th, 9th)
Address: Peninsula Barracks Romsey Road Winchester SO23 8TP
Join local architect Huw Thomas on a guided tour of the  Peninsula Barracks and discover the history behind  this five acre site.  Huw will regale you with tales of  executions, ghosts, mass graves, bloody 13th  century  battles, and his very own battle to save the buildings from demolition  in the 1980’s.

Serle’s House Tour: 10.00 (7th, 8th 10.00 & 14.00)
Address Serles House Gar Street Winchester SO23 8GQ
A rare chance to see inside this 18th century building built in the English Baroque style. Join a guided tour to see the staircase, reception rooms and period items and paintings from both the military and Hampshire County Council collections.

St Bartholomew Church 1000-1600 (7th, 8th, 9th 9:30-10:00, 10th Church closed after 9:30am morning service)
Address: St Bartholomew Church King Alfred Place Winchester SO23 7DN
St Bartholomew was built by the monks of Hyde Abbey in the 12th century. Parts of the original church survive, including the Norman doorway. When the Abbey was destroyed by Henry VIII, its stones were used to build the church tower. King Alfred the Great is long rumoured to be buried in the churchyard.

St John the Baptist’s Church 1000-1700 (7th, 8th, 9th & 10th)
Address: St John the Baptist’s Church St John’s Street Winchester SO23 0HF
Winchester’s oldest parish church is situated on the ancient Pilgrim’s Way between Winchester and Canterbury. Built in the 12th century, later features include a spectacular south window, wall paintings and screen. Described by Sir John Betjeman as ‘a gem’, major restoration has revealed its medieval simplicity and beauty.

St Lawrence-in-the-Square 10.00-16.30 (7th, 8th, 9th & 10th times vary)
Address: St Lawrence Church The Square Winchester SO23 9EX
St Lawrence was a deacon martyred in Rome in AD 258. The Church stands on the site of the chapel of William the Conqueror’s Palace. It is called the Mother Church of Winchester, for it is the only surviving church of Norman foundation within the city walls. Before a new Bishop of Winchester is enthroned, he is first presented at St Lawrence.

St Swithun-upon-Kingsgate 1000-1630 (7th, 8th, 9th & 10th times vary)
Address: St Swithun-upon-Kingsgate St. Swithun Street Winchester SO23 9JP
St Swithun is the only church above a gate in the UK still holding church services. It was built in the 13th century and named after a local bishop, Swithun, thought to have been the tutor of King Alfred the Great. When Swithun’s bones were moved to the Cathedral against his wishes, a terrible storm occurred, giving rise to the legend that if it rains on St Swithun’s Day (15th July), it will rain for 40 days.

The Great Hall 10.00-17.00; Special Tours 1100 & 1500 (7th, 8th, 9th & 10th times vary)
Address: The Great Hall Castle Avenue Winchester SO23 8UJ
Explore the history and legend of The Great Hall, join our enthusiastic and knowledgeable guides with 2 tours on offer and storytelling for children. Visitors will have a rare chance to see the 18th century Former Grand Jury room and discover Charles II’s vision of a King’s House in Winchester.

Warren & Son 09.00-17.30 (7th, 8th, 9th & 10th times vary)
Address: Warren & Son 85 High Street Winchester SO23 9AE
Look inside the big safe which is rarely open to the public. There you will see memorabilia and several tokens from the past including some first edition books published by Warrens.

Whitchurch Silk Mill on Tour 9am – 5pm (7th, 8th, 9th times vary)
Address: Hampshire Record Office Sussex Street Winchester SO23 8TH
Whitchurch Silk Mill has been awarded a grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund to assist with the restoration of its machinery and buildings to preserve these unique gems of Hampshire’s industrial heritage. Closed from September 2017 the Mill’s Roadshow will give people a glimpse of this exciting project.

Winchester Cathedral: tours of the close Tour: 10.00 & 14.00 (7th, 8th, 9th & 10th)
Address: Winchester Cathedral The Close Winchester SO23 9LS
Cathedral guides will be offering tours of the Cathedral Close, including some buildings not normally open to the public. The tour itinerary will vary but may include the brand new Wessex Learning Centre and apothecary garden, the stonemasons’ and carpenters’ workshops and private gardens

Winchester College – College tours 1015, 1130, 1415 & 1530 (7th, 8th, 9th & 10th times vary)
Address: Winchester College College Street Winchester SO23 9NA
Believed to be the oldest continuously running school in the country, Winchester College was founded by William of Wykeham in the 14th century and has been described as one of the finest collections of historic buildings in southern England. Join a guided tour to find out more. Unsuitable for children under 11yrs.

Winchester College – War Cloister tour Tours at 14.00 and 15.00 (7th)
Address: Winchester College College Street Winchester SO23 9NA
Winchester College was founded in the 14th Century and has been described as one of the finest collections of historic buildings in Southern England. Within the precincts is the beautiful and peaceful War Cloister, a memorial to Old Wykehamists who died in both World Wars and subsequent conflicts. Listen to their stories and the story of the building of this wonderful memorial. Unsuitable for young children.

Winchester Embroiderers Guild 1000-1700 (7th, 8th 09.30-16.00)
Address: St Lawrence Church 18-19, The Square Winchester SO23 9EX
An opportunity to meet Winchester Embroiderers Guild members demonstrating stitched textile techniques. There will also be a small display of members’ work in a range of styles.  We are a diverse group of textile artists who enjoy celebrating our heritage in contemporary as well as historical embroidery.  We look forward to meeting you.

Gilbert White’s House 10:30am -17:00pm
(7th)
Address: High Street Selborne Alton GU34 3JH
A rare chance to view items from the collections store not on display in the Museum. From personal items belonging to 18th century naturalist Gilbert White, to artefacts brought back from Africa by Victorian explorer Frank Oates, and memorabilia from the tragic Terra Nova expedition to the South Pole in 1912 led by Captain Scott.

Hinton Apmner – National Trust 10:00-17:00 (9th)
Address: Hinton Ampner Nr Alresford SO24 0NH
A house lovingly rebuilt by Ralph Dutton, after a fire in 1960. Beautifully proportioned rooms house an exquisite collection of ceramics and art. Manicured lawns lead the eye down avenues of sculptured topiary, past borders full of roses, to views across the South Downs. Explore the grounds with a brand new Quiz Trail App and follow clues to discover the secrets of Hinton Ampner.

Long Barn 0900-1700 EXHIBITION ONLY (7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, paid talk available on some dates)
Address: The Old Sheep Fair Bishops Sutton Road Alresford SO24 9EJ
Long Barn home & garden store loves all things lavender!  Visit their free exhibition of artefacts showcasing English lavender growing.

Matterley Bowl Tour 09.00, 11.00, 13.00 (7th)
Address: off A31 alresford road Alresford SO21 1HW
Discover the recent history of the Matterley Bowl and join a guided tour of this stunning natural amphitheatre within the SDNP. Learn about traditional land management and go in search of late flying butterflies. This event is not suitable for small children.

The Brickworks Museum, Bursledon 11.00 – 16.00 (7th & 10th)
Address: The Brickworks Museum Swanwick Southampton SO31 7HB
Come and be amazed at the authentic sights, sounds and smells of the last steam-driven Victorian brickworks in the UK. Make your own brick, get close to the massive brick making machines and see how the men used to run 15 miles a day in the big drying sheds.

Watercress & Gin 18.00-20.00 (7th)
Address: The Watercress Co Old Alresford Alresford SO24 9DH
Explore the history of watercress in Hampshire, take a guided walk around the beds and learn more about the health-giving properties of watercress and wasabi. Afterwards visit the Winchester Distillery site for a tour and free tasting of their award-winning watercress gin. This event is not suitable for children under the age of 18yrs.
Pre-booking essential, for over 18yrs only

Other exciting events include:

Antiquarian Bookselling in Winchester over the years: Weekend
Archaeology at St. Cross Hospital: Friday only
Austen abridged: Saturday only
Barter Memorial Chapel: Saturday only
Free Vintage Bus Service: Saturday only
Friends Meeting House: Weekend
HCT: Behind-the-scenes at Chilcomb House: Friday only
HCT: Brass rubbing at The Westgate: Sunday only
HCT: Musicians at the Westgate: Saturday only
HCT: The Winchester Model at City Museum: Sunday only
Hampshire Record Office Open Day: Saturday only
Jeremy France Jewellers: Saturday only
Morally Insane, Inverted, Born This Way: Medical Treatments for Lesbianism in Britain: 1830-1950 Saturday only
Pilgrim’s Hall: Friday & Sunday
St Cross Meadows: Friday only
Storytelling at Winchester City Mill: Sunday only
The Chesil Rectory & more: Friday & Saturday
The Colour Factory Studios: Sunday only
The Guildhall tour: Sunday only
The Hospital of St Cross: Friday only
The Stable: Cider Tasting & Talk: Saturday only
The Tree Line: Poetry at Pilgrims Hall: Saturday only
Theatre Royal: behind the scenes tour: Saturday only
Vintage Make Do & Mend: Weekend
vOx Chamber Choir: Saturday only
Winchester City Mill – Flour Milling Weekend: Weekend
Winchester College – Archives tour: Saturday only
Winchester College – Fellows’ Library tour: Friday only
Winchester College – Science Collections tour: Saturday only
Winchester College – Treasury: Weekend
Winchester Lido: Saturday only
Winchester MG Owners Club Display: Saturday only
Winchester’s Historic Journey Through Paper Cut: Friday & Saturday
Winchester’s Military Museums: Weekend
Wolvesey Castle guided tour: Sunday only
Bullington Craft Fete: Sunday only
Heathcote Mausoleum: Sunday only
Hockley Watermill: Sunday only
Hursley House: Sunday only
The Granary Creative Arts Centre: Weekend
The Grange at Northington: Friday only
The Vyne: Weekend
Walking Tour of Winchester’s Historic Sites and Best Real Ale Pubs: Saturday only